On Talismans

I  never thought much about Talismans until I realized I was collecting them.

One I call “King David’s Stone.”  It’s history and features are worth relating.

I began to hike to a burned out stump I’d stumbled upon one day while hunting for morels several years ago.  It was quite extraordinary in that it stood in the shape of a warrior.   I would hike to it almost every week.

The forrest fire that had done the sculpting had rendered two legs supporting a body with what appeared to be a shield and sword at the ready.  The sword was raised above the figure’s head and a spire of the original stump had broken off so that the narrow piece pointing skyward showed an edge of natural wood.  Except for this feature, which could only be described as an extended blade, the entire figure was charcoal.

At the time of its discovery, I had been reading the history of King David in the old testament.  He was a brutal man whose chief qualification for being a leader seems to have been his great skill at killing loads of people. (Sorry if that upsets any of you. but that’s how it reads to me).  Naturally I instantly dubbed the stump “King David.”

The extraordinarily fine natural, and presumably accidental, sculpting combined with what seemed to be incredible coincidence prompted much self-examination.  It had been several years since the Vision, but it seemed undeniably another sign.  I sat for many hours on a log that made for good viewing, Trumpeting in meditation.

One day I happened to look at the ground at my feet and discovered a most unusual stone.  It was a nearly perfect rotational body whose generational planar figure was an ellipse (sorry for the math-talk, but that’s my habit–and “egg” just doesn’t do the trick, and it isn’t quite accurate, anyway).

The surface was rough, but the shape was perfect for accuracy as a projectile.  You remember, I trust, the story of David and Goliath.  This found at the foot of King David!  I’ve looked every since, but have never found such a rock again.  Many come somewhat near in shape, but they’ve all been either broken in half, or decidedly more egg shaped.

When I returned home with my newest Talisman, I discovered yet another fascinating trait.  If you sat it down on a hard flat surface, in almost literally any position, it rolled.  I eventually found one very narrow flat spot on which you could stand the stone on its end.

But even its rolling was weird.  It would roll until it almost stopped, but then would roll a little more, then some more again, and again; coming at last to rest with a series of little jumps that reminded me of the Mexican Jumping Beans I had known in my youth in the southwest-but they had worms in them causing the movement.

This was likely the very stone David had used to slay Goliath.  I have no idea how it could have made its way from the middle east to a hill overlooking Lake Tahoe, but that was long ago, and just since it’s been with me it has traveled a lot, so who’s to say it isn’t so?

Why is it so hard for me to accept obvious signs?

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3 Responses to On Talismans

  1. Hank Raymond says:

    Got any photos of King David?

  2. JoAnn Saccato says:

    Sounds like a series of coincidences, George. Ones that have affected you deeply.

    Why do we not take “signs” seriously? I am constantly given opportunities to trust in the divine and i consistently try to use my stubborn ego-centered mind to solve my problems. When i relax and spend time just presencing in the moment, the right next step seems to automatically appear and happen. So, my task is to keep presencing and the rest just happens as a result. Very Taoist. Or, as i coined while traveling in India, “Resting in the Buddha-nature, the rest unfolds.”

    I recently listened to an amusing “This American Life” on coincidences…you might enjoy it, too. It was based on a Japanese saying, “No coincidence, no story.”

  3. George says:

    Sounds like a series of coincidences, George. Ones that have affected you deeply.

    Why do we not take “signs” seriously? I am constantly given opportunities to trust in the divine and i consistently try to use my stubborn ego-centered mind to solve my problems. When i relax and spend time just presencing in the moment, the right next step seems to automatically appear and happen. So, my task is to keep presencing and the rest just happens as a result. Very Taoist. Or, as i coined while traveling in India, “Resting in the Buddha-nature, the rest unfolds.”

    I recently listened to an amusing “This American Life” on coincidences…you might enjoy it, too. It was based on a Japanese saying, “No coincidence, no story.”

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